Gamers outraged by Wordle’s ‘too British’ response

Warning: This story contains spoilers for the Wordle online game.

They felt like an American Wordler in London.

Amid ongoing complaints that The New York Times ruined Wordle, Thursday’s response caused an uproar among US-based players, who deemed the response decidedly “too British”. A Twitter thread detailing the allegedly Anglo-centric vocabulary – spoilers below – is currently exploding online.

For the uninitiated, the viral puzzle – in which players get six tries to guess a new five-letter word each day – has become a daily routine for puzzle enthusiasts lately. Nevertheless, American Wordlers were baffled by Wordle 250’s answer “dude” – British slang for “man”, which they found incomprehensible to anyone who did not live across the pond.

“Hello everyone except this guy who chose today’s Wordle,” fumed a frustrated Twitter user.

“THIS HAS TO BE THE MOST BRITISH WORLD I’VE SEEN F–KING BLOKE,” grabbed another.

“Nobody else uses ‘dude’ but the Brits,” growled a puzzled Wordler of the termwhich is also ubiquitous in Australia and New Zealand.

Interestingly, the complaints mark a complete reversal from several weeks ago, when British puzzle fanatics slammed Wordle for using American spellings of certain words.

It’s been a trying week for the word puzzle, which was lambasted by Wednesday’s Wordle solution, “trove” – ​​a collection of valuable items – which users also found incredibly obscure.

The New York Times bought the puzzle from creator Josh Wardle last month for an undisclosed seven-figure sum.
AFP via Getty Images

“Someone just DMed me today’s response to Wordle which I can only describe as an act of terrorism,” exhaled an outraged Twitter user on allegedly vexing vocabulary.

The complaints follow weeks of backlash that began last month after The Times bought the puzzle from creator Josh Wardle for an undisclosed seven-figure sum. On February 17, irate social media users claimed they couldn’t win the match of the day due to too many vocabulary variations. The day before, the Times was accused of ‘dragging millennials’ with a word of the day ‘so obscure’ that only animated problem-solver ‘Bob the Builder’ could understand.

About Walter Bartholomew

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