Is 60 the new 40? British pensioners feel younger than ever, survey finds

Is 60 the new 40? British pensioners feel younger than ever, survey finds

  • Almost half of over-60s said they insist old age starts at 76
  • Research shows most retirees feel around 12 years younger than their actual age
  • One in ten people had more energy than their children and could work as a spy
  • It comes down to puzzles, playing sports and spending time with grandkids










It used to be assumed that old age started when you started drawing your pension. But apparently it starts now when you hit 76.

That’s the figure that emerges from a survey of over-60s, nearly half of whom insist that “60 is the new 40”.

Research, from activity provider Treasure Trails, found that most retirees feel around 12 years younger than their real age – thanks to activities such as playing sports, solving puzzles and spending time with their little ones -children.

One in ten even say they have more energy than their children and are able to work as a spy or private detective.

It used to be assumed that old age started when you started drawing your pension. But apparently it now starts when you press 76 (file image)

Aaron Hutchens of Treasure Trails said: ‘Today’s grandparents feel younger than ever.

Research has found that the average Briton aged 60 or over feels 12 years and 5 months younger than their actual age.

Indeed, 22% say they feel 20 years younger and 46% insist they feel more lively and capable than their parents at the same age.

More than one in five say playing with their grandchildren helps them stay young and two-thirds (64%) believe that ‘solving puzzles’ keeps their minds from deteriorating.

One in ten play sports with their grandchildren (10%) and 11% defy stereotypes by playing with the youngest on consoles or tablets and smartphones.

In addition, 5% like to visit escape rooms and 1% even practice adrenaline sports such as kitesurfing, skydiving or mountain descent.

As February’s midterm approaches, many families will ask older parents to help entertain their children.

With 33% of grandparents enjoying outdoor physical activity and sports the most with their grandchildren, followed closely by 31% who enjoy cracking codes and solving mysteries, it would seem a digital detox is on the way. the cards.

Dr David Abrutat, a GCHQ historian and intelligence and security services expert, said: “Since the beginning of espionage, there have always been codes and ciphers to be cracked, with analysis of the data that takes place behind the scenes.”

“It’s so great to see grandparents still solving puzzles – maybe British intelligence could see new recruits arriving in their 60s.”

About Walter Bartholomew

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