Only a few songs will make the next decade in this era of fast food music – Songwriter

Songwriter and techpreneur, Isaac Quarcoo said recent marketing trends had a serious impact on music making at this time.

According to him, many musicians would now rather make songs that will top the charts for the next two weeks than one that will last for the next few years.

Speaking in an interview, Mr Quarcoo said that “our songs today reflect our collective way of life. From self-tuned artists to artists who write songs for a machine to sing. I fully understand that times change, who wouldn’t be happy if one machine could do the work of three or more people? »

“But, how effective can these fast food songs be? Hits are so important, but are we singing to make money now, totally ignoring the longevity of craft and songs? The Founder and President of the Techpreneurs Union of Ghana interviewed.

He felt that most of the songs that are currently in our music stores will completely disappear in a few years due to the huge effect that digital marketing has had on musical fraternity around the world.

“I’m only afraid that our musicians will be artists for a few years because their songs couldn’t keep their careers up the stairs. Like it or not, there are plenty of artists today who are relevant not because they make hit or viral songs, but as a result of past songs they’ve made that have could stand the test of time.

Quarcoo cited TikTok and Triller, in particular, as tools that help promote songs easily while undermining artists’ production prowess around the world.

He said it’s because some artists make trending music on these apps.

“You will testify to me that most of the songs that trended in the first quarter of 2022 are fading and new ones are coming in, is that the way we want to go?” He asked.

Quarcoo said it’s important for artists to promote their music, especially in this digital world, but they also need to consider longevity and quality.

About Walter Bartholomew

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