Portland restaurant owner abandons the city for the suburbs | Local News

PORTLAND, Ore. (KPTV) — It’s the town that doesn’t work, if you ask Jaime Soltero Jr., owner of small restaurant chain Tamale Boy.

“I mean, I get robbed there, two, three times a year,” Soltero said. “We get dumped with trash and stuff, which we end up constantly paying for.”

“Illegal dumping is happening,” he continued. “Vandalism.”


PORTLAND, Ore. (KPTV) — Portland businesses continue to experience vandalism and burglaries.

Soltero said he had tried to hold on for the past two years, but after seeing no change, he planned to move his headquarters to N. Russell Street to the suburbs. The Russell St. location is where all of its production takes place.

He also has a Tamale Boy location on N. Dekum St. in Portland, which will remain on site. He also has a location in Happy Valley.

“I spoke to a group of people and those of us who moved some of our operations out of town, we were made very welcome,” Soltero said.

At downtown Mother’s Bistro, chef and owner Lisa Schroeder closed another window after saying someone tried to smash it on Tuesday. Just a week and a half ago she said the same thing happened to another window.

“The one that broke yesterday is about twice as big, so that’s a difference of about $1,600 versus $6,000, so that’s a really big expense,” she said. “For restaurateurs like me, this is a very difficult time.”

But Schroeder said she was staying in her downtown neighborhood.

“Mum [Bistro] it’s like having a baby,” she said. “You don’t give it back.”

“It’s yours forever, so I’m going to work hard to keep the mother alive and keep us going,” Schroeder continued.

Schroder thinks it will take everyone coming together to solve the town’s problems.

“We all have to work together,” Schroeder said. “From homeless people to business owners, to politicians and cart owners, we all need to get together in one room and figure out what we can do to bring Portland back to the sweet place it once was. “

Soltero thinks the town can return as well, but not in the time he needs to run a successful business.

“I think there will be hope,” Soltero said. “I just can’t continue on this path.”

“Something had to change and that’s the only reason I would even consider doing it now,” he continued.

Soltero said the city’s response time was another reason to move its headquarters. As for permits or any questions, he said it takes months to get an answer.

He said his experience has been completely different and positive, working with towns like Beaverton and Tigard.

Fox 12 contacted the mayor’s office. A spokesperson said they would try to provide a response on Thursday.

Soltero is still deciding exactly where he will move in the suburbs.

Copyright 2022 KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.

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